Open Sky Wilderness Therapy

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Information
Current status Open
http://www.secretprisonsforteens.dk/images/Detainees.gif | }} Capacity | }} | }}
Checked January 24, 2016
http://www.secretprisonsforteens.dk/images/Open.gif | }} Opened | }} 2005 | }}
http://www.secretprisonsforteens.dk/images/Close.gif | }} Closed | }} | }}

Open Sky Wilderness Therapy is a behavior modification program using wilderness therapy as programming method.

It is employee-owned by Fernandes and partners, including clinical director Joanna Bettman, a University of Utah professor of social work.

It was founded in 2005 <Ref>About the program, NATSAP</Ref>.

The admission office is located in Durango, Colorado, but they transport the detainees into an area in Utah for the program.

They can detain 24 teenagers and the program last between 5 and 12 weeks with an average stay of 9 weeks.

Program structure[redigér]

They use a level system with 5 levels called Gateway, South, West, North and East.

Each level have different goals.

Typical days[redigér]

According to the homepage of the program a typical day looks like this

7:30
7:45-8:15
8:15-9:00
9:00-9:15
9:15-10:45
10:45-1:15
1:15-2:00
2:00-3:00

Wake up
Morning yoga/meditation activity
Breakfast
Hygiene
Pack/Morning Chores
Hike
Lunch
Curriculum

3:00-4:30
4:30-5:00
5:00-6:30
6:30-7:30
7:30-9:30
9:30-10:00
10:00

Hike
Journaling
Camp Set-up/Evening Chores
Process Group
Dinner/Community Time
Clean-up/Evening Hygiene
Bedtime

Misc.[redigér]

They also run a program for young adult between 18 and 30. Unlike the teenagers these are voluntary participants <Ref>Open sky at a glance..., program homepage</Ref>.

News[redigér]

  • In 2008 newspapers in Salt Lake Tribune published news including a runaway case and a girl who got injured due to a fall <Ref>Wilderness Therapy Camps, Salt Lake Tribune, August 2008</Ref>.

Recent sheriff's records: In October 2007, a girl ran away from Open Sky and ended up on a woman's porch with no shoes, saying she had been kidnapped and her wrist was hurt when she refused to submit to a strip search, according to a report from the San Juan County Sheriff's Office. Her father, who lives in San Francisco, retrieved her and said it was the fourth such camp she had run away from. The same month, another girl fell about 20 feet and was taken to a hospital with neck and back pain.

External Links[redigér]

Info pages[redigér]

Survivor Groups[redigér]

Message boards[redigér]

References[redigér]

<References />